The International Criminal Court (ICC)

The International Criminal Court is an international tribunal that investigates and tries individuals charged with the gravest crimes of concern to the international community

 
 
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CHAIR: Elkhyn Rivas

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case a: OTP v. Andrew Jackson, et. al.

The Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court will prosecute Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren, Presidents of the United States of America, for the Crime of Genocide under Article VI of the Rome Statute. On December 8, 1829, President Jackson declared before the United States that attempts by Native Americans “to erect an independent government within the limits of Georgia and Alabama” had left him with no choice but to inform those individuals “that their attempt to establish an independent government would not be countenanced by the Executive of the United States” and to advise “them to emigrate beyond the Mississippi or submit to the laws of those States.” Despite stating that “this emigration should be voluntary,” after the passage of the 1830 Indian Removal Act--which demarcated territory west of the river Mississippi into tribal districts, effectively trading the promise of lands in the west in exchange for extant tribal holdings in the east--state and federal governments were able to leverage financial incentives and the threat of war to force tribal peoples, beginning with the Choctaw Nation in 1831 and continuing throughout the course of the decade, to cede their lands and move westward, the most famous application of this policy of course being the 1838 removal of the Cherokee people during the Presidency of Martin Van Buren. The policy is estimated to have led to the deaths of tens of thousands of Native Americans.


CASE B: OTP v. William McKinley, et. al.

The Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court will prosecute William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt II, Presidents of the United States of America, for War Crimes under Article VIII of the Rome Statute. Between February 4, 1899, and July 2, 1902, a formal state of war existed between the United States and the First Philippine Republic (after 1902, an unincorporated territory of the United States). During that time, units of the United States Army and Navy committed numerous atrocities against Filipino combatants and non-combatants.


CASE C: OTP v. Andrew Jackson, et. al.

The Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court will prosecute Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren, Presidents of the United States of America, for the Crime of Genocide under Article VI of the Rome Statute. On December 8, 1829, President Jackson declared before the United States that attempts by Native Americans “to erect an independent government within the limits of Georgia and Alabama” had left him with no choice but to inform those individuals “that their attempt to establish an independent government would not be countenanced by the Executive of the United States” and to advise “them to emigrate beyond the Mississippi or submit to the laws of those States.” Despite stating that “this emigration should be voluntary,” after the passage of the 1830 Indian Removal Act--which demarcated territory west of the river Mississippi into tribal districts, effectively trading the promise of lands in the west in exchange for extant tribal holdings in the east--state and federal governments were able to leverage financial incentives and the threat of war to force tribal peoples, beginning with the Choctaw Nation in 1831 and continuing throughout the course of the decade, to cede their lands and move westward, the most famous application of this policy of course being the 1838 removal of the Cherokee people during the Presidency of Martin Van Buren. The policy is estimated to have led to the deaths of tens of thousands of Native Americans.