Disarmament and International Security Committee

The Disarmament and International Security Committee deals with demilitarization, international issues and obstacles to peace that affect the international community and seeks out solutions to the challenges in the global security regime.

 
 
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Chair: Tim Feng

What's up DISEC! I'm Tim, a sophomore majoring in Operations Research and Financial Engineering. On campus, I am involved with Princeton Ultimate, PMUNT, Entrepreneurship Club, and Princeton Corporate Finance Club. Looking forward to meeting you all and seeing what ideas and debate you guys bring in the fall!

Email: tzfeng@princeton.edu

Send Position Papers To: pmunc.disec@gmail.com


chair: Angela Weng

Hi everyone! I'm Angela, from West Windsor, New Jersey. I'm a sophomore majoring in Operations Research and Financial Engineering, with interests in the computer science and machine learning certificates. On campus, I'm part of club tennis and Tiger Investments. I'm excited to meet you all in November!

Email: aw36@princeton.edu

Send Position Papers To: pmunc.disec@gmail.com

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Topic A: Ramifications of Space Development

In the Outer Space Treaty approved by the United Nations in 1967, countries agreed to reserve space for peaceful purposes. However, despite the treaty, many countries have increased spending on space-based weaponry and exploration for the purpose of benefiting national interests. Moreover, interest in the privatization of space has grown, which could lead to controversies between the public and private sectors, as well as between countries. How can DISEC address these issues and maintain stability between nations with regard to space?


TOPIC B: Cybersecurity: Implications of Reliance on Data Security

In our day and age, data is of profound value to governments and corporations. This was proved recently by the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica data scandal, in which Cambridge Analytica collected information via surveys on Facebook and sold the personal information of participants to politicians running for election. To make matters worse, Facebook's design allowed the Cambridge Analytica survey not only to get the personal information of participants, but also everyone in the social networks of said participants, exploiting the information of millions of additional Facebook users without their consent. By selling personal information such as public profiles, page likes, birthday, location, and even the News Feed, timeline, and messages of certain users, Cambridge Analytica undoubtedly influenced the campaigns of purchasers of such information, with some notable names being Ted Cruz and eventual President-elect Donald Trump. The security of citizens' personal information has also been recently jeopardized by the Equifax data breach in 2017, in which personal information was not sold and purchased but outright stolen from US, UK, and Canadian citizens by hackers. How governments and corporations handle data is incredibly important to the security of citizens, and DISEC should not only consider how to make cybersecurity strategies more available and effective, but also who has the right to control, access, and potentially sell/purchase personal information.